Control of paratuberculosis: who, why and how. A review of 48 countries

A wide ranging study on the current state of play of Johne’s disease control globally has been recently published showing that the world is moving quickly to address Johne’s disease in farmed ruminants and dairy derived foodstuffs. Formal control programs are underway in 22 mostly developed countries, and are justified most commonly on animal health grounds, protecting market access and public health.

Interestingly, in this study, NZ is wrongly accredited with having a Johne’s control scheme (the only JD monitoring carried out in NZ is abattoir surveillance conducted by the deer industry but with no followup actions mandated for suspect Johne’s-like lesions). In fact, NZ has no formal Johne’s control programme.

Read the full article here. Our own Prof. Frank was a contributing author to this publication.

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